Terms used in shipping such as Shipping Mark,Shipping Weigh,Shipping Weight,Ships, Shipment

 

Terms used in shipping such as Shipping Mark,Shipping Weigh,Shipping Weight,Ships, Shipment etc.

 

 

 

This post explains about terms used in shipping such as Shipment,Shipper,Shippers Association,Shipper's liability,SHIPPERS,Shipping Mark,Shipping Weigh,Shipping Weight,Ships etc. These terms used in international business are arranged in alphabetical order and you may add more information about terms used in export business at the end of this article, if you wish.

 

Terms used in shipping

 

 

Shipment:The tender of one lot of cargo at one time from one shipper to one consignee on one bill of lading.

 

Shipped Bill of Lading or Shipped on Board Bill of Lading - Bill of Lading issued when the goods have been loaded on board the ship. This type of Bill of Lading, which must contain a reference to the goods having shipped on board, is often required by banks who advance money using the Bill of Lading as collateral security and who wish to be satisfied that the goods are on board the ship.

 

Shipped on board:Endorsement on a bill of lading confirming loading of goods on vessel.

 

Shipper - any person or organization paying for its cargo to be shipped from one place to another.

 

Terms used in shipping such as Shipping Mark,Shipping Weigh,Shipping Weight,Ships, Shipment etcSHIPPER’S EXPORT DECLARATION (SED):A form required by the U.S. Treasury Department and completed by a shipper showing the value, weight, consignee, and destination of export shipments as well as the Schedule B identification number.

 

Shippers Association:A non-profit entity that represents the interests of a number of shippers. The main focus of shippers associations is to pool the cargo volumes of members to leverage the most favorable service contract rate levels.

 

Shipper's Export Declaration - The SED includes complete particulars on individual shipments and is used to control exports and act as a source document for the official U.S. export statistics. SEDs must be prepared for shipments through the U.S. Postal Service when the shipment is valued over $500. SEDs are required for shipments, other than by the U.S. Postal Service, where the value of commodities classified under each individual Schedule B number is over $2,500. SEDs must be prepared, regardless of value, for all shipments requiring a validated export license or destined for countries prohibited by the Export Administration Regulations. SEDs are prepared by the exporter and the exporter's agent and delivered to the exporting carrier (such as: post office, airline, or vessel line). The exporting carrier presents the required number of copies to the U.S. Customs Service at the port of export. The Foreign Trade Statistical Regulations (15 CFR, Part 30) provide the statistical requirements for use by exporters, freight forwarders, and ocean carriers concerning preparation and filing of SEDs.

 

Shipper's Instructions:Shipper's communication(s) to its agent and/or directly to the international water-carrier. Instructions may be varied, e.g., specific details/clauses to be printed on the B/L, directions for cargo pickup and delivery.

 

Shipper's Letter of Instructions for Issuing Air Waybill:A document required by the carrier or freight forwarders as a prerequisite to obtain (besides the data needed) authority to issue and sign the waybill in the shipper's name.

 

 

 

Shipper's Letter of Instructions for issuing an Air Waybill:The document required by the carrier or freight forwarders to obtain (besides the data needed) authorization to issue and sign the air waybill in the name of the shipper.

 

Shipper's liability:The liabilities of the shipper in the container transportation. This kind of liabilities is not completely same as the classical shipping, in which the shipper of less than container load has same liabilities as classical shipping, while that of full container load has the following different liabilities: 1) Assure the transport information to be correct and complete; 2) The carrier has the right to check the goods in the containers, the cost of which is assumed by the shipper; 3) If the custom or other authorities uncovers the containers, the cost and the resulting damage or short of the goods is assumed by the shipper; 4) If the container is not full, or has bad padding or piling, or contains the goods not suitable for container transportation, the resulting damage or short is assumed by the shipper. 5) The damage from the use of unsuitable containers of the shipper is assumed by the shipper; 6) The damage to the property or life of the third part during the period to use the containers or equipment of the carrier is compensated by the shipper.

 

Shipper's Load & Count (SL&C):Shipments loaded and sealed by shippers and not checked or verified by the carriers. Also known as shipper's load, stow and count.

 

Shipper's Load and Count:Shipments loaded and sealed by shippers and not checked or verified by the carriers or forwarders. Neither the carriers nor the forwarders will assume any liability for shortages of cargoes as long as the container seal remains intact at the time of devanning.

 

SHIPPERS:Individuals or businesses who purchase transportation services or commodities.

 

Shipping Act of 1916:The act of the U.S. Congress (1916) that created the U.S. Shipping Board to develop water transportation, operate the merchant ships owned by the government, and regulate the water carriers engaged in commerce under the flag of the United States. As of June 18, 1984, applies only to domestic offshore ocean transport.

 

Shipping Act of 1984:Effective June 18, 1984, describes the law covering ocean transportation in the U.S. foreign trade.

 

Shipping Act of 1998:Amends the Act of 1984 to provide for confidential service contracts and other items.

 

SHIPPING ACT:Created in 1916 and revised in 1984, the Shipping Act is a comprehensive legislative act defining the U.S. ocean freight industry. This legislation defines the rules and regulations governing the business practices of steamship companies, non-vessel operating carriers, and freight forwarders.

 

Shipping Mark:The letters, numbers or other symbols placed on the outside of cargo to facilitate identification.

 

Shipping Marks and Numbers:Shipping marks are placed on packages for identification purposes. They can be the size and weight of the carton, the recipient, the number of the carton (e.g. 1 of 6 etc) and sometimes a shape. These marks are essential to differentiate the boxes belonging to each set of goods within a shared container.

 

Shipping Order:A set of documents of carriers or forwarders which allows the shippers to book shipping space with them. There are a number of copies with the same form and contents but with different names such as the 1st copy is called Shipping Order and the remainders are called Shipping Order Copy or Dock Receipt for different purposes such as space control, surveyor and sworn measurer, confirmation of receipt of cargoes/containers, etc. As EDI is more popular nowadays and used by both the shipper and Customs, hardcopy Shipping Order is no longer widely used.

 

Shipping Order:Shipper's instructions to carrier for forwarding goods; usually the triplicate copy of the bill of lading.

 

 

 

Shipping Permit:Issued by a shipping or carrier company giving the receiving clerk at pier, dock, warehouse, airport, or on board, the authority to receive a stipulated amount of merchandise from a specified firm.

 

Shipping Weight - Shipping weight represents the gross weight in kilograms of shipments, including the weight of moisture content, wrappings, crates, boxes, and containers (other than cargo vans and similar substantial outer containers).

 

Shipping Weight:Represents the gross weight in kilograms (kg) of shipments, including the weight of moisture content, wrappings, crates, boxes, and containers (other than cargo vans and similar substantial outer containers).

 

Shipping Weight:Shipping weight represents the gross weight in kilograms of shipments, including the weight of moisture content, wrappings, crates, boxes, and containers (other than cargo vans and similar substantial outer containers).

 

Ships:

 

· Bulk Carriers: All vessels designed to carry bulk cargo such as grain, fertilizers, ore, and oil.

 

· Combination Passenger and Cargo Ships: Ships with a capacity for 13 or more passengers.

 

· Freighters: Breakbulk vessels both refrigerated and unrefrigerated, containerships, partial containerships, Roll-on/Roll-off vessels, and barge carriers.

 

· Barge Carriers: Ships designed to carry barges; some are fitted to act as full containerships and can carry a varying number of barges and containers at the same time. At present this class includes two types of vessels LASH and Sea-Bee.

 

· General Cargo Carriers: Breakbulk freighters, car carriers, cattle carriers, pallet carriers and timber carriers.

 

· Full Containerships: Ships equipped with permanent container cells, with little or no space for other types of cargo.

 

· Partial Containerships: Multipurpose containerships where one or more but not all compartments are fitted with permanent container cells. Remaining compartments are used for other types of cargo.

 

· Roll-on/Roll-off vessels: Ships specially designed to carry wheeled containers or trailers using interior ramps.

 

· Tankers: Ships fitted with tanks to carry liquid cargo such as: crude petroleum and petroleum products; chemicals, Liquefied gasses(LNG and LPG), wine, molasses, and similar product tankers.

 

The above details describes about terms called in shipping such as Shipment,Shipper,Shippers Association,Shipper's liability:,SHIPPERS,Shipping Mark,Shipping Weigh,Shipping Weight,Ships etc. These phrases may help importers and exporters on their day to day business activities. The readers can also add more information about terms used in shipping business below this post.Terms used in shipping such as Tranship, Transhipment, Transit Cargo, Transship, Transshipment,Transtainer etc

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